5 Types of Email Marketing Flows You Should Have

Email marketing is a valuable marketing strategy for any business. While there are many ways to reach your customers, studies have shown that email remains the preferred method of communication between consumers and businesses. Even more, email is a cost-effective strategy with a strong return on investment. According to the Direct Marketing Association, the average company saw a $42 return for every dollar they spent on email marketing.

“While the primary purpose of email marketing to promote your products and services, you can use this strategy in numerous different ways,” says Detroit Internet Marketing. “Email marketing allows businesses to build brand awareness, nurture their leads, educate their market, and keep subscribers informed.” Yet, despite the wide array of benefits, businesses still struggle to create effective email campaigns, namely because they don’t know where to start.

An email workflow or “flow” is a series of automated emails triggered by a person’s behavior (such as placing an order or abandoning a cart). You may not realize it, but chances are you’ve been a part of several companies’ email flows. Email flows help move leads down the sales funnel, strengthen your email marketing strategy, and saves time via automation. With this in mind, here are five flow sequences you need to have in your email marketing platform of choice:

Welcome Flow

Your Welcome Flow is probably the single most important sequence your business will have. Studies have shown that, on average, welcome emails generate 320% more revenue than traditional emails. Welcome emails also have higher engagement and open rates. An email sequence is also more likely to generate 13% more revenue on average than single welcome emails. Therefore, put a considerate amount of thought into your welcome flow, its contents, offers, and design.

Abandoned Cart Flow

Cart abandonment is a major revenue leak and it’s something many ecommerce companies struggle with. While studies vary, estimates suggest that three out of four consumers will abandon a cart before they make a purchase. Oftentimes, they need a little nudge to encourage them to complete a purchase. An abandoned cart flow is triggered automatically. The first email simply reminds them that they’ve left items in their cart. A second email could offer a discount and convince people to follow through if they’re on the fence. Another email might include a higher discount and/or free shipping. Even if you don’t retain everyone who abandoned their cart, this specific flow can help you win back plenty of dollars.

VIP Flow

A VIP flow is designed to show a deeper level of appreciation to your top customers. Not only can your drive repeat sales from your highly engaged customers, but you can also turn them into brand advocates through personalized emails and recognition. There are several ways you can identify your VIP customers, including based on a number of orders placed, high average order value, lifetime revenue, and placed order and/or revenue. You can show appreciation to your VIP customers by offering exclusive deals and promotions. You should also include referral emails into this flow to help secure recommendations from ideal customers.

Post-Purchase Flow

Did you know that sending an email right after a purchase has been made is pretty effective? After a sale is made, follow up with your customer and let them know you’re thankful for their business and are happy to ask any questions. You should use the post-purchase flow to encourage additional spending; believe it or not, if a customer has just spent money on your business, they’re likely to feel comfortable spending a little more with the right offer. Your post-purchase flow can include a thank you email, a discounted offer, a request for a review, and a final thank you email with discount code.

Upsell & Cross-Sell Flow

You can get your customers to spend more money by upselling and cross-selling your products and services. Upselling encourages your customers to buy a pricier version of your product while cross-selling suggests related products your customer might be interested in. You can maximize the relevance of your offer through automation and triggers.

For example, let’s say you run an eCommerce company that sells hair products and accessories. If someone purchases a blow dryer on your website, it could trigger a flow that cross-sells complementary products (like a blow-drying brush) or upsells (like a more expensive blow dryer with better features). Good times to upsell and cross-sell are immediately after a purchase, when a trial has been completed when a customer hits a milestone, or when you’ve released a new product.


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