Tips for Opening a barbershop: A Step-by-Step Guide

Owning a barbershop or beauty salon is the ultimate goal for most barbers and beauticians, but there is a lot to do to prepare. Let’s face it—if running a barbershop or salon was easy, then everyone with the ability to cut hair would do it. To be successful, you have to become more than a barber or beautician—you have to become a businessperson.

Opening a barbershop image of barbershopBefore you’re ready for business, you have a lot of affairs to handle. Your first orders of business are to find a location for your shop or salon and get it licensed. You have to equip your shop, hire other barbers, and market your business. While there’s a lot to learn about business, you have the essential skills to succeed. There’s no need to go back to school to learn how to run your shop. Continue reading to get some tips to help you get started.

Find a Location

The first step to owning a barbershop or salon is—of course—to find a location. You don’t need to have an MBA to understand the importance of location to the success of your business. The key is to make your shop accessible to the consumers who will make up your target market. A shopping center that sees a lot of traffic near the demographic of people you want to serve is the ideal spot for your salon.

You have to take into account that the more traffic a particular location sees, then the higher the rent for that spot will be. Lendingbuilder.com can help you find a loan so you can get your shop up and running in your dream spot.

Also, you may still be able to find something more affordable in the same area but off the beaten path. Eventually, your business will grow, and you’ll be ready for expansion. When the time comes, you’ll be able to move to your dream location or even open a second barbershop or beauty salon there.

Get Your Business Registered and Licensed

Once you have a spot, the next thing you need to do is get it ready for business. Your first step is to register your shop. Registration is just to let the state know that your salon exists.

The next thing you need to do is get your business license so that you can legally operate your business. Being that you will be a sole proprietor—or one of a few—you should register as an LLC. As an LLC, your business doesn’t pay federal taxes, but the government taxes each owner’s income.

Get Your Shop Outfitted

After you’ve found a location and gotten your legal affairs straight, it’s time to get your shop ready for business. If you want to set your barbershop or beauty salon apart from your competitors, then you have to deliver premium hair cuts and provide a unique experience.

You may be tempted to go with the most affordable barber chairs, clippers, and other accessories, but it’s better to spend more for something stylish and durable.

You want your guests to feel comfortable and confident in your shop when they sit in your barber chair. Vintage barber chairs like the ones from Keller International will give your barbershop or beauty salon an air of sophistication and nostalgia.

Whether or not you can afford the top brands, be diligent when looking for equipment for your beauty salon. People can spend a lot of time waiting on a hair cut or new do, so you want to keep them at ease and entertained. Create an atmosphere that is conducive to friendly conversation and have activities available for your energetic kid-clients.

Market Your Barbershop or Salon

The only way that your barbershop or beauty salon will be successful is if you get the word out about it. When you come to a new area, you need to make your business known to the people in the community.

One way to do that is to invite people to your shop or salon for a grand opening social. You don’t have to do anything extravagant, but show the community that you’re there to serve it. Throw a barbecue or have a small indoor party with light drinks and music. A lot of barbershops offer free hair cuts for special occasions like job interviews, graduation day, and the first day of school. The point is to show the people in the community that you’re one of them.